Established 2005 Registered Charity No. 1110656

Scottish Charity Register No. SC043760

118 Jan-Feb 2019

current issue

the Pavement

the Pavement is the free magazine for the UK's homeless people

We are committed to publishing objective reportage, tailored to a homeless readership, and to publicising the complete range of services available to homeless people, to reduce hardship amongst our readers and to enable them to guide their future.

We believe that drives to produce homogenous services for homeless people are misguided, and that a range of service types and sizes are the only way to cater successfully for our diverse readership.

We believe that sleeping rough is physically and mentally harmful; however, we do not preach to those who chosen to, nor do we believe that all options to get off the streets are necessarily beneficial to long-term health and happiness.

DOWNLOADS

Your rights

The Rights Guide for Rough Sleepers outlines your rights around arrest, stop and search, answering police questions, move-ons, no-drinking zones, sleeping rough, taking a pee in public and highway obstruction. It was put together by The Pavement, Housing Justice, Liberty and Zacchaeus 2000.

If your benefits have been sanctioned (cut off or reduced) and you feel this is unfair, you can appeal. Print this letter and hand it in at the office where you sign on. If you feel you need more advice about sanctions, contact   Zacchaeus 2000 or your nearest Citizen’s Advice Bureau. And let us know contact@thepavement.org.uk at The Pavement!

VOLUNTEER

If you are a journalist with some free time to research and write stories for the magazine, please contact us web@thepavement.org.uk. For other volunteering opportunities, please approach organisations listed on our Services pages or your local volunteer centre

The web site is coded by hand at Flat Earth Industries
Ollie the twitterrific bird appears courtesy of www.twitterrific.com

IN THE LATEST ISSUE

Working homeless: Homeless paradox
There’s a dispiriting new trend: having a job but still being homeless. This special issue looks at the hard truths of working while homeless. For the 11 years I’ve worked in London I’ve never had stable accommodation. At best all I could afford was a room in a...
Building people
We report back from the first International Arts and Homelessness Festival & Summit held in ManchesterWatching Eve Steele and Neil Bell deliver stellar performances in Ed Edwards’s The Political History of Smack and Crack is an absolute torturous delight, like watching a slow-motion replay of a long-drawn out...
Summing up
How a pledge wall, audience participation and a new mural shows that...
Deposit help
London For nearly three years Fat Macy’s has run dining events across...
Working homeless: Work band-aid
For the working homeless is your job an extra burden or a...
Working homeless: "I've got 99 problems"
Starting a job and trying to cope till your first pay day...

ANNOUNCEMENTS

07 March 2018
Our team of peer journalists from the 'From the Ground Up' project talk about perceptions of homelessness.
09 February 2017
Our Glasgow Word On The Street project went so well that we are now running it in London. Véronique Mistiaen, lecturer and human rights journalist, led the second session, 'How to tell your own story'. you can read more about the project on her blog, The Right Human. Check out the trainees' blog to follow their progress from newbie to news hound.
23 June 2015

Will you use your admin ninja skills to help a unique small charity working to support homeless people?

23 June 2015

Do you want to use your fundraising skills to support a unique small charity working to support homeless people?

23 June 2015

Will you donate your a journalism or photography skills to help the homeless people we work to support?

04 November 2014
Our Glasgow-based Word on the Street team of reporters and photographers – along with London guest writers, who also have experience of the homelessness – has been working hard on a special edition that tells it how it is: benefit sanctions, a cartoon about hostel life and how football can change the world, for starters. The WOTS team is: Iain Alan, Brenda Brown, Brian Dobbie, Jason Kelly, Peter Kelly, Jim Little, Caroline McCue, Alex McKay, Patrick O’Hare and Roddy Woods. Thanks, team!
19 August 2011
Wow. The Pavement’s Homeless City Guide, which appears in every issue of the magazine, has made it into New York’s Museum of Modern Art. 

LATEST STORIES

Left: Mat; right: Jimmy Left: Mat; right: Jimmy

Forty-five artists took part in Bad Behaviour art collective’s Ideal Homelessness Show in December raising a fantastic £1,000 for the Pavement. Organiser Araba Ocran said: “We wanted to make a space where homeless people are visible, creative and relevant.” Mission accomplished as there were 120 visitors plus the staff and residents of Great Guildford Street Hostel who “made us feel very welcome.” Our striking cover is by one of the Bad Behaviour artists, James Tuitt to highlight racism in the fashion and beauty industries, with a focus on celebrating the vital contributions black models are making to fashion/ art/beauty images despite the rejection they face.  More show pix on Instagram @b_behaviour and twitter @B_Behaviour © Bad Behaviour


Christmas visit

The Pavement’s From The Ground Up team, including most of the writers of this issue; homeless health charity Groundswell; the Pilion Trust (which helps homeless 18–25-year-olds) and students from University of the Arts’
London College of Communication met Guardian journalist Patrick Butler at the famous newspaper’s offices to learn about pitching homelessness stories.

News in brief, January-February 2018

Never failed me yet: It took half an hour to read out the names of all the people who’ve died this year in London while homeless or insecurely housed at the November 2018 Service of Commemoration. The final list was 165, up yet again (in 2017 it was 70). Photo is of Don Pollard, at St Martinin- the-Fields, whose art was used for the service sheet. The national press ignored this story, focusing instead on Brexit resignations. © the Pavement Never failed me yet: It took half an hour to read out the names of all the people who’ve died this year in London while homeless or insecurely housed at the November 2018 Service of Commemoration. The final list was 165, up yet again (in 2017 it was 70). Photo is of Don Pollard, at St Martinin- the-Fields, whose art was used for the service sheet. The national press ignored this story, focusing instead on Brexit resignations. © the Pavement

Sharing stories

Tamsen Courtenay’s crowdfunded book Four Feet Under, untold stories of the homeless in London, features around 30 interviews with people living in central London. “I’ve had hundreds of people read it and say, ‘It’s changed the way I relate to homeless people',” says Tamsen. “But unless there’s a sea change, I can’t see how homelessness will go away – it’s not a society that looks after its vulnerable.”

Spiralling numbers

Analysis from the homeless charity Shelter shows that the number of homeless people in England, Scotland and Wales is increasing by more than 1,000 a month.

Shelter finds that there are 320,000 homeless people by counting people in temporary accommodation, rough sleepers and single hostel spaces. In just one year the total number of homeless people has increased by 13,000 and that’s without including the hidden homeless population, such as sofasurfers. Shelter’s report also revealed that about one in every 52 people in London is homeless.

“The causes are multi-faceted and complex, but include lack of supply of decent affordable housing, lack of protection for private renters and freezes and cuts to welfare payments,” claims Shelter.

Read more: Homelessness in Great Britain: the numbers behind the story (Nov 2018) on England.shelter.org.uk

Broken record

When CNN reported that roughly one in every 200 people in the UK sleep rough, or are in temporary accommodation, James Brokenshire, the well-named Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, was adamant the Government could solve the crisis. Responding to the data, he said "Our rough-sleeping strategy, support for councils and those working on the frontline are helping to get people off the street and into accommodation as we enter the colder winter months.” We know better.

Glasgow shame

Business owners have lobbied Glasgow council to act tougher on anti-social behaviour, according to Glasgow Live. Without suggesting any initiatives the Glasgow Action Group (GAG) was critical of MPs and the council. Local homeless charities warned that GAG’s tone risked putting vulnerable homeless people in danger.

Listen up

More than 50,000 young people facing homelessness were left without meaningful support last year, despite approaching their local councils for help. Of the estimated 103,000 16- to 24-year-olds seeking help from councils, the Guardian reports that just half (48%) got any helpful advice. The research, produced by youth homelessness charity Centrepoint, shows that those receiving help had actually increased on the previous year (2016–17, when only 42% young people received support). Those who had no support last year (52%) should be protected by the new Homelessness Reduction Act, as they are guaranteed support moving forward. But Centrepoint warns that local councils have insufficient resources to meet the new demands.

• See www.gov.uk Homelessness Reduction Act A guide to the duty to refer

Christmas bonus

In 2017 the Welsh government promised to allocate £10 million to help end youth homelessness by 2027. In November Wales Online detailed that £3.7 million will go towards early intervention, boosting resources available to the education system and youth work services.

A further £4.8m will be spent on new housing options. This includes funding for innovative ideas on housing options. £1 million will be spent on providing basic financial support for young people. Finally, £500,000 will be split between tenancy support and communication programmes.

Missed target

Scotland's promise to develop 35,000 new homes for social rent by 2021 is one of the most important projects on the Scottish Government’s agenda. But by December 2018, halfway to deadline, only 11,825 social homes had been completed.

Grinch-y landlords

A boycott of companies, planning to donate a percentage of their Christmas profits to the homeless charity Shelter, was launched by a group of UK landlords. Housing industry website Property Industry Eye reveals that the National Landlords Alliance wrote to companies, including B&Q and Marks & Spencer, warning that they would no longer purchase products from the stores should they donate to Shelter. B&Q hoped to raise £25,000 for Shelter over the festive period, through sales of fairy dolls.

Art world

A pop-up art exhibition was opened in December, promoting the work of homeless artists. The exhibition, which took place in Bedford, hosted numerous works from artists who were using the services of YMCA Bedfordshire, Emmaus Village Carlton, Bedford Women's Refuge and the King's Arms Project, according to the BBC. Former rough sleeper Adam had more than 12 paintings on display and says his passion for art helped him beat his alcoholism. "We [homeless people] have a place in society and we can do some things better than most people. Stop the stigma,” he told the BBC.

Hungary’s homeless

Human Rights Watch has condemned the Hungarian government’s decision to criminalise rough sleeping. The Fidesz party, led by the far-right Viktor Orbán, first tried to criminalise rough sleeping in 2012 but was told it “violated human dignity”, the Financial Times reported. So Orbán set about amending the constitution.

The new constitutional ban came into effect in October 2018 and outlaws sleeping in a public space. Being caught more than three times gets you taken into custody and possessions confiscated.

Wheely kind

Top: Season 1 From The Ground Up writers, John Dovan and Mahesh Pherwani, now volunteer for Emmaus Lambeth & Surrey’s social enterprises which include clothes-, furniture- and white goods shops. Below: Loui at Emmaus Lambeth makes the best tortilla. “I stepped in for an hour of the spinathon and my legs hurt for a week!” © the Pavement Top: Season 1 From The Ground Up writers, John Dovan and Mahesh Pherwani, now volunteer for Emmaus Lambeth & Surrey’s social enterprises which include clothes-, furniture- and white goods shops. Below: Loui at Emmaus Lambeth makes the best tortilla. “I stepped in for an hour of the spinathon and my legs hurt for a week!” © the Pavement

Previously homeless residents at Emmaus Lambeth & Surrey raised £1,846.29 for the Pavement at their recent 24-hour spinathon. Emmaus was founded in France by a priest, but since the first UK Emmaus opened in Cambridge in 1989, it now has 29 communities stretching from Dover to Glasgow. Emmaus Lambeth & Surrey is non-religious and has just opened a second, seven-bed, property in Croydon.

At Bobby Vincent House in West Norwood the 27 residents, known as companions, are the spinathon champions. Here they work a 40-hour week – driving the van, collecting donated furniture, running the shops and household duties – in return for housing and life skills. To move in companions must stop claiming benefits but receive a weekly allowance of £35, a savings fund and budgeting support to prepare them for moving into their own place. At other Emmaus centres, companions run cafes, offer gardening and removal services.

• Would Emmaus suit you?
Find out more on www.emmaus.org.uk or call 07495 391 023 or email refer.el@btconnect.com

 

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