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thePavement

thePavement is the free magazine for the UK's homeless people

We are committed to publishing objective reportage, tailored to a homeless readership, and to publicising the complete range of services available to homeless people, to reduce hardship amongst our readers and to enable them to guide their future.

We believe that drives to produce homogenous services for homeless people are misguided, and that a range of service types and sizes are the only way to cater successfully for our diverse readership.

We believe that sleeping rough is physically and mentally harmful; however, we do not preach to those who chosen to, nor do we believe that all options to get off the streets are necessarily beneficial to long-term health and happiness.

 
 

Downloads

Your rights

The Rights Guide for Rough Sleepers outlines your rights around arrest, stop and search, answering police questions, move-ons, no-drinking zones, sleeping rough, taking a pee in public and highway obstruction. It was put together by The Pavement, Housing Justice, Liberty and Zacchaeus 2000.

If your benefits have been sanctioned (cut off or reduced) and you feel this is unfair, you can appeal. Print this letter and hand it in at the office where you sign on. If you feel you need more advice about sanctions, contact  Zacchaeus 2000 or your nearest  Citizen’s Advice Bureau. And let us know at The Pavement!

 

volunteer

If you are a journalist with some free time to research and write stories for the magazine, please contact us . For other volunteering opportunities, please approach organisations listed on our Services pages or your local volunteer centre

 
 
 

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Ollie the twitterrific bird appears courtesy of www.twitterrific.com

 

In the latest issue

 

A recent report published by the homeless charity Crisis and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation discovered that nine out of 10 English councils found it difficult to help homeless single people. ‘The Homelessness Monitor: England’ is an annual independent study that analyses the impact of economic and policy developments on homelessness.

The report found that a majority of...

 
 

Fresh from broadcasting his moving and powerful BBC documentary on suicide, inspired by his father, who took his own life, rapper Professor Green is turning his attention to youth homelessness.

In a flyer posted by Homeless Link, Antidote Productions (which made the first documentary) is calling out for participants who are young and homeless to send...

 

Breaking News

 
A recent report published by the homeless charity Crisis and the Joseph...
 
 
As Crisis opens its Christmas centres to an expected 4,000 homeless guests,...
 
 
"When you get a bit older, the shades come off and you...
 
 
We had half expected it but when it did arrive, handed to...
 
 
I am 60 years old. And I am eight years old. You...
 
 
The Pavement has launched a short film to show the impact it...
 
 
 

Announcements

23 June 2015
 

Our Glasgow Word On The Street project went so well that we are now running it in London. Véronique Mistiaen, lecturer and human rights journalist, led the second session, 'How to tell your own story'. you can read more about the project on her blog, The Right Human. Check out the trainees' blog to follow their progress from newbie to news hound.

 
 
23 June 2015
 

Will you use your admin ninja skills to help a unique small charity working to support homeless people?

Download PDF (141KB)

 
 
 
23 June 2015
 

Do you want to use your fundraising skills to support a unique small charity working to support homeless people?

Download PDF (146KB)

 
 
 
23 June 2015
 

Will you donate your a journalism or photography skills to help the homeless people we work to support?

Download PDF (146KB)

 
 
 
04 November 2014
 

Our Glasgow-based Word on the Street team of reporters and photographers – along with London guest writers, who also have experience of the homelessness – has been working hard on a special edition that tells it how it is: benefit sanctions, a cartoon about hostel life and how football can change the world, for starters. The WOTS team is: Iain Alan, Brenda Brown, Brian Dobbie, Jason Kelly, Peter Kelly, Jim Little, Caroline McCue, Alex McKay, Patrick O’Hare and Roddy Woods. Thanks, team!

 
 
19 August 2011
 

Wow.  The Pavement’s Homeless City Guide, which appears in every issue of the magazine, has made it into New York’s Museum of Modern Art. 

Latest Stories

 

Landlord fine for eviction

 04 January 2016
 

The tenant's dumped possessions. © Birmingham Mail
A Birmingham landlord has been ordered to pay more than £5,000 for illegally evicting a mother and her 11-year-old son.

Sead Alimajstorovic changed the locks on the house, and later left her a note saying she could not move back into the house and her belongings were in the garden and shed.

Mr Alimajstorovic was fined £1,035, with £4,044.75 costs and a victim surcharge of £104 after pleading guilty to an offence of unlawful eviction.

Homeless charity Shelter has been campaigning for more rights for tenants, particularly as more homeless people find themselves in private lets.

At the Pavement, we'll also be keeping an eye on how Universal Credit is pushing more councils to place people in private rental accommodation, and reporting on what this means for tenants.

Are you facing eviction?

Use Shelter’s eviction tool to find out if your landlord can legally evict you:
•  England: http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/downloads_and_tools/eviction_checker
•  Scotland: http://scotland.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/advice_topics/eviction.

 
 
 

Homeless: sanction risk doubles

 31 December 2015
 

Homeless people are twice as likely to be sanctioned as other benefit claimants, according to a new Crisis report.

The report is based on a survey of 1,000 people in hostels and day centres in 21 cities, plus 42 in-depth interviews.

Of those interviewed: 21 per cent reported becoming homeless as a result of sanctions; 16 per cent said they had been forced to sleep rough; 77 per cent had gone hungry or skipped meals; 75 per cent said it negatively affected their mental health; 64 per cent had gone without heating; and 60 per cent found it harder to look for work.

“Too often, the system didn’t take their circumstances or aspirations into account,” said Jon Sparkes, Chief Executive of Crisis, “and instead seemed to treat them with mistrust.”

 
 
 

The Spice ain’t nice

 31 December 2015
 

© Everythingcannabis.co
Homeless charities continue to raise concerns about the increasing use of synthetic cannabis known as ‘Spice’.

In early December, The Connection at St Martin held a forum about the drug, where Spice users could share their experiences and get advice on its potential dangerous side affects.

Meanwhile Homeless Link, in partnership with the Manchester Day Centres forum, is working on a project to record all legal high “incidents”.

Although it is often a legal high (depending what’s inside), experts say Spice is up to 100 times more potent that normal cannabis. In a blog for Homeless Link, Carole Fox of Birmingham charity Sifa Fireside writes: “The physical reaction … is often dramatic. When a client has used legal highs there is a possibility that they will ‘drop like a stone’ to the floor and their complexion will take on a green and yellowish tone.

On occasion, they have also appeared extremely psychotic, and we’ve even had one incident in which a client stopped breathing.”

A recent monitoring report by Heriot Watt University and Crisis suggested that legal highs were a growing problem, both causing homelessness and making it more difficult to deal with.

For more information on Spice, visit Drugscope.

 
 
 
 

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© Copyright 2009-2014 The Pavement. Established 2005 Registered Charity No. 1110656 Scottish Charity Register No. SC043760 ISSN (online) 1757-0484