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Scottish Charity Register No. SC043760

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Winter and homeless

December 01 2022
We Remember: St Martin-in-the-Fields on the day of the service © the Pavement We Remember: St Martin-in-the-Fields on the day of the service © the Pavement

Winter is often the harshest season, but every person experiencing homelessness has a friend in the Pavement.

Winter is often the harshest season. Freezing temperatures punish people sleeping rough, and feelings of isolation and loneliness can be all the more acute during the festive season. But every person experiencing homelessness has a friend in the Pavement.

This issue we take a look at experiencing homelessness during the winter, with a number of articles aimed at finding some shelter or some support during the colder months. See page 18 for information on Crisis at Christmas 2022, including a helpful map of where the centres are located. Sophie Glickman pens a piece on how The Connection at St Martin’s can offer help this winter on page 28.

Alongside the regular news, views and cartoons, there are short stories and absorbingly creative pieces to enjoy. See page 22 for Chris Sampson’s latest, and page 26 for David Wishart’s return. We hope everyone enjoys the holidays and have a happy new year.

- the Pavement team


We Remember

The annual service of commemoration for people who have died homeless was held at St Martin-in-the-Fields in November. The service was hosted by St Martin-in-the-Fields and organised by the Connection at St Martin’s, the Museum of Homelessness and Housing Justice.
Everyone at the Pavement wishes to thank the organisers of the service, and pass on our deepest condolences to people who have lost somebody this past year. Reverend Richard Carter, who led the service, commented that “this service is one of the most important services that we hold at St Martin’s each year. Usually we remember one person who died but at this service we remembered more than 140. Our aim is to give those who died recognition, dignity and peace”.
The names of people who died experiencing homelessness were read out during the service, which also featured moving performances from the Choir with No Name and Streetwise Opera. After the service Reverend Carter noted “the average age of the names we have read out today [at the service of commemoration] is 48 – in this one of the richest cities in the world. As the economic situation worsens [this winter] it is the poorest who will suffer most.”


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